Scouts Find What Farmers Already Knew: Variability Plagues Ohio

“There’s a lot of prevent plant acres,” says Pro Farmer’s Jeff Wilson. “You know, there were a couple times where we were at our marker and we just decided to take the corn measurement and then drive another mile down the road for the soybeans, because it's very difficult to find a corn and have been right next to each other.” ( Farm Journal )

As scouts made their way across Ohio on Monday, variability was the best way to describe what they found. “It’s a pretty interesting tour so far,” AgDay host Clinton Griffiths says. “We’ve seen a little bit of everything.”

The variability within the fields is widespread too.

Pro Farmer editor and director of the Eastern Leg of the Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour, Brian Grete, says unprecedented immaturity means Ohio crops need at least another 45 days to make it. 

“The immaturity of the crop is pretty much universal,” he said. “Some fields are decent, some are good and some are clunkers.”

Watch Griffiths give a glimpse of one of today’s Eastern Leg tour stops. 

 

It's a similar story on the Western leg of the tour. 

“There’s a lot of prevent plant acres,” says Pro Farmer’s Jeff Wilson. “You know, there were a couple times where we were at our marker and we just decided to take the corn measurement and then drive another mile down the road for the soybeans, because it's very difficult to find a corn and have been right next to each other.”

Wilson described his route as “ground zero” for prevent plant acres. 

“Some beans are up to your knee and there's some that are up to your waist,” he says. “The pod counts are all over the place from 340 up to 960. Nothing great, but at least there are some beans there. I was worried that it might not be any pods to count, but they definitely need some time.”

The corn crop is in a similar situation, he says. 

“It's highly, highly variable and it’s pretty immature,” he says. “We picked a lot of ears that probably just tasseled in the last two weeks. It's tough to measure those.”

The best field on Wilson’s route was a 20-inch row field, which he says was around 250 bushels per acre, but it was very immature. 

Scouts have seen a lot of green snap and Wilson says you can tell several fields were planted in wet conditions. 

“Kernel rows were twisted and turned and things like that,” he says. “So they had a little stress when they were developing those kernels.” 


Find complete Crop Tour route reports, market analysis and historical comparisons at ProFarmer.com.


Follow along with today’s coverage:

Inconsistent, Sparse Fields Plague South Dakota

Soybeans Have a Long Way to Go in South Dakota

Jerry Gulke: Will Pro Farmer Crop Tour Validate or Invalidate USDA?

How Will Pro Farmer Crop Tour Account For Immature Crops, Bare Fields?

Crop Tours Hit The Road

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