Make Safety a Priority

Be sure to have the right safety equipment on hand for everyone—gloves for each job and ear and eye protection. ( Lindsey Benne )

While safety should be a top priority all year long, spring planting means long days in the tractor and working with treated seeds and chemicals. Be sure to have the right safety equipment on hand for everyone—gloves for each job and ear and eye protection. Make sure emergency contact information is easily accessible.


First-Aid Kits for the Farm

Most farms and ranches require multiple first-aid kits due to the many types of jobs and the dispersed areas of work. Not only is it important to have appropriate first-aid kits, it’s vital you and others in your operation understand basic first aid and CPR.

Click here to read what you should have when assembling a first-aid kit.


5 Steps To Take If An Employee Is Injured On Your Farm

Farming is a dangerous business. Every day, 100 agricultural workers suffer lost-work-time injuries, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports 258 farmers, ranchers and other agricultural workers died in 2017. While you hopefully never experience an employee death on your farm, it’s highly likely one of your team members will be injured on the job. 

Having a plan can be invaluable in a crisis, says Charles Schwab, Iowa State University Extension safety specialist. “In the heat of the moment, you don’t want to be bogged down with ‘What should I be doing?’” he says. “It should be more instinctual, ‘We know this is what we need to do.’” In the event of an injury, take these steps:

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