Instant Pot and Weber Grills: Two Promotions to Boost Pork Consumption

Three out of four people believe pork must be cooked all the way through, to temperatures that make it challenging to end up with a juicy, flavorful product. ( Sara Brown )

Food trends can change on a dime. While BBQ will never go out of style, the popularity of Instant Pots and changing food technology can spark new ways for consumers to eat more meat.

During the 2018 World Pork Expo, Jared Sutton, director of domestic marketing for the National Pork Board shared the three pillars his division is focusing on: communicating product nutrition, positioning pork as a product of convenience and educating consumers on how to prepare pork cuts for a satisfying eating experience.

“Pork has eight cuts that meet the specifications USDA has for the definition of lean. That's an important message that we intend to more aggressively communicate out to consumers and to stakeholders to be consistent,” he said.

As part of that effort, Sutton says the National Pork Board is using two marketing strategies to appeal to consumers.

Taking Advantage of Popular Cooking Aids

Instant Pots are all the rage among Millennials. The quick, home-cooking tool has opened a whole new market for meat consumers. It’s a combination slow cooker and pressure cooker that makes cooking ribs, roasts and pork chops table-ready in a third of the time.

“We have products that fit into this new cooking trend, and now [we have] videos that illustrate [how to use them]. We're also doing a partnership with Weber grills,” Sutton said.

The cooking temperature of pork remains a fact consumers want to know: Three out of four people believe pork must be cooked all the way through, to temperatures that make it challenging to end up with a juicy, flavorful product. On the plus side, nine out of 10 consumers say if they knew USDA recommended the right temperature for pork, they would be more willing to purchase pork cuts.

One way to get that message out is aligning with Weber Grills for the meat probe, Sutton explained. The probe works with your smartphone to monitor the meat as it is cooking to make sure it reaches the optimal internal temperature.

“It's one example of how we're effectively embracing technology and leveraging checkoff dollars to extend our reach to ensure that we're providing accurate, factual information,” Sutton said.

“That's the world that we live in today," he added, "especially with social media. We've got to be engaged and connected with consumers and position our messaging to effectively appeal to what they're most interested in [and] are concerned about.” 

 

 

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