Farmers Turn to The Sky To Get Soybeans Planted

As with all planting decisions, talk to your insurance agent before flying on soybeans. Individual policies have different rules in regard to how the crop is planted. ( Farm Journal )

As Mother Nature continues her relentless pursuit to stall and, in some cases, cancel #plant19, some farmers have found a way around her. In the parts of the country where fields are still too wet to get planters into fields, farmers are flying on soybean seed. 

Kyle Blaydes who farms 2,300 acres in Montgomery County, Indiana is one of those producers. Slowly maturing wheat fields that won’t be ready to harvest in time to plant a shortcrop of soybeans presented Blaydes a unique challenge. During lunch with his co-op manager Sam Fry and his seed dealer Deric Hitch, Blaydes mentioned a Facebook video of a helicopter planting soybeans and thought why not us, according to a story by Purdue University. 

“We had a crop duster (pilot Tyler Rice of Bi-State Air, Inc.) on one phone and some seed people on the other trying to figure out how quickly we could make this happen,” Blaydes said. The crop was planted by 6 p.m. that same night. 

Blaydes isn’t the only farmer turning to the sky to complete #plant19. 

As with all planting decisions, talk to your insurance agent before flying on soybeans. Individual policies have different rules in regard to how the crop is planted.

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