CCA Experts In The Field: Tailor Sustainable Ag As A System

The approach to sustainable agronomy requires crop advisers and farmers use a systems approach, according to Lee Briese, a crop consultant in North Dakota. ( Aimee Cope )

The approach to sustainable agronomy requires crop advisers and farmers use a systems approach, according to Lee Briese, a crop consultant in North Dakota.

Briese will be presenting at the upcoming Sustainable Agronomy Conference, which he says will be focused on tools and information crop advisers can apply directly in the field.  

Briese explains sustainable agronomy isn’t just a group of practices—it’s tailoring those practices and having a plan for how you’ll use them. He recently called into AgriTalk to talk more about why a systems approach is the successful path for sustainable agronomy. 

“A systems approach allows us to factor in many practices and tailor those to an individual farm and an individual location,” he says. “For example, with thousands of soil types across the United States, you can’t do the same thing in one area you do in another.” 

One example he gives is the journey to improve soil health. 

“First, we try to reduce mechanical tillage and use more reduced tillage practices. We also use crop rotation and add cover crops to give more plant diversity. Then we follow integrated pest management,” he says. 

Without a plan, any one of those practices could fail. But considering them as part of an overall system helps leads to success. 

You can learn more at the upcoming Sustainable Agronomy Conference in Omaha, Nebraska. 
Hosted by the CCA program and the American Society of Agronomy on July 10 and 11, the core focus of the conference will be in-field and farm-gate implementation not abstract science, hype, or vague concepts.

Learn how to further implement sustainable agronomy using sound science, proven field techniques, and cutting-edge technologies. The program will also include local cropping system considerations related to sustainable practices.

Registration includes 1.5 days of sessions, lunch & breaks, up to 11 CEUs, and direct access to the leading experts in the field of Sustainable Agronomy.

The Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) Program is established as the benchmark for agronomy professionals and is the largest, voluntary certification program in North American agriculture. It provides base-level standards for agronomic knowledge through a national and regional testing process, and raises those standards through annual continuing-education requirements. An agronomist who becomes a CCA has demonstrated commitment, education, expertise, and experience when advising farmers on making the best land management, agronomic, and economic decisions possible.
 

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