UF/IFAS irrigation apps for urban turfgrass, strawberry, citrus

decrease font size  Resize text   increase font size       Printer-friendly version of this article Printer-friendly version of this article

The University of Florida has released three smart device apps of interest to those in the irrigation business, and for the time being, users can download them for free.

The first three apps to be released were designed for citrus, strawberry and urban turfgrass irrigators, said Kati Migliaccio, an associate professor in agricultural and biological engineering, based at the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences’ Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, Fla.

Details about all three of the newly released apps can be found at http://smartirrigationapps.org/.

Development of the three new apps was funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Migliaccio said. They were designed to convert available information into a user-friendly format to help users conserve water, she added.

“The tools are designed to be easy and quick to use,” she said. “We’ve incorporated real-time data and irrigation science with simple user input to produce site specific irrigation run-times.”

The apps give real-time information to users, relying on constantly updated data from the Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) and the Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network.

Each of the three apps is tailored to a crop – for instance, the strawberry app is based on drip irrigation, the citrus app works for micro-sprinkler systems and the urban turfgrass app gives guidance for five types of sprinklers.

The developers began with citrus, strawberry and urban turfgrass because UF/IFAS already had a strong research and knowledge base in those areas, she said.

The app is designed for use with manual or time-based irrigation systems, users download the app, plug in their individual details, such as location, root depth and irrigation zones, and the app uses that input and site-specific weather data to create an irrigation schedule.

The schedule is not set in stone, however, and the app gives users notifications based on changing weather and forecasts. For instance, the app might suggest to users that if there is a rain chance above 60 percent that irrigation might not be necessary. Or if there significant rain fell in the last 24 hours, the app might suggest skipping irrigation for a day.

Migliaccio said she believes the urban turfgrass app will reduce irrigation amounts by 25 to 30 percent, if suggested schedules are followed. Potential water savings from using the citrus and strawberry apps for irrigation scheduling are still being quantified.

The app covers users in Florida and Georgia and is compatible with the iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and Android devices. It is available to download in the App Store and Google Play Store. The apps’ names in the stores are Smartirrigation Citrus, Smartirrigation Strawberry, and Smartirrigation Turf.

The apps are part of an overall suite of apps being developed, Migliaccio said.

UF/IFAS and UGA are also working with other researchers in the Southeast through the Southeast Climate Consortium based at UF, to create irrigation apps for avocado, cabbage, cotton, peanut, and tomato growers.

Migliaccio has published a step-by-step information guide about the urban turfgrass app, which can be viewed or downloaded from the UF/IFAS Electronic Data Information Source, or EDIS, here: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae499.

The three apps are currently free, and will remain so as long as the weather and forecasting data are free and grants are available to support app maintenance, she said.

The other researchers involved in this app release include UF/IFAS’ Clyde Fraisse, an associate professor in agricultural and biological engineering and Kelly Morgan, an associate professor in soil and water science, and George Vellidis, a professor who specializes in precision agriculture and water management at the University of Georgia’s Tifton campus.


Prev 1 2 Next All



Buyers Guide

Doyle Equipment Manufacturing Co.
Doyle Equipment Manufacturing prides themselves as being “The King of the Rotary’s” with their Direct Drive Rotary Blend Systems. With numerous setup possibilities and sizes, ranging from a  more...
A.J. Sackett Sons & Company
Sackett Blend Towers feature the H.I.M, High Intensity Mixer, the next generation of blending and coating technology which supports Precision Fertilizer Blending®. Its unique design allows  more...
R&R Manufacturing Inc.
The R&R Minuteman Blend System is the original proven performer. Fast, precise blending with a compact foot print. Significantly lower horsepower requirement. Low inload height with large  more...
Junge Control Inc.
Junge Control Inc. creates state-of-the-art product blending and measuring solutions that allow you to totally maximize operating efficiency with amazing accuracy and repeatability, superior  more...
Yargus Manufacturing
The flagship blending system for the Layco product line is the fully automated Layco DW System™. The advanced technology of the Layco DW (Declining Weight) system results in a blending  more...
Yargus Manufacturing
The LAYCOTE™ Automated Coating System provides a new level of coating accuracy for a stand-alone coating system or for coating (impregnating) in an automated blending system. The unique  more...
John Deere
The DN345 Drawn Dry Spreader can carry more than 12 tons of fertilizer and 17.5 tons of lime. Designed to operate at field speeds up to 20 MPH with full loads and the G4 spreader uniformly  more...
Force Unlimited
The Pro-Force is a multi-purpose spreader with a wider apron and steeper sides. Our Pro-Force has the most aggressive 30” spinner on the market, and is capable of spreading higher rates of  more...
BBI Spreaders
MagnaSpread 2 & MagnaSpread 3 — With BBI’s patented multi-bin technology, these spreaders operate multiple hoppers guided by independent, variable-rate technology. These models are built on  more...


Comments (0) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left


1325 Bushel Grain Cart

Equipped with a 22” computer balanced auger with 5/16” flighting,the unloading speed is 50% faster than smaller grain carts with ... Read More

View all Products in this segment

View All Buyers Guides

Feedback Form
Feedback Form