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New approaches to weed management: Public-private partnerships

Large scale management of weed populations is vital to decreasing propagule pressure and reducing weed seedbanks. Unfortunately, demands for improved management techniques will escalate in many areas as herbicide resistance (HR) expands.

News

Growers up the ante for 2015 herbicide resistance management

Herbicide resistance management continues to be a priority for corn and soybean growers, and they’re working together more effectively to slow the spread of resistant weeds, according to a survey sponsored by DuPont Crop Protection at the 2015 Commodity Classic in Phoenix, Ariz.

Products

ISU's Herbicide Guide offers strategies to manage resistant weeds

Bob Hartzler and Mike Owen, professors of agronomy and ISU Extension and Outreach weed scientists, updated the 2015 Herbicide Guide for Iowa Corn and Soybean Production to reflect the 2014 growing season, product effectiveness and changes in industry offerings.

Products

Priaxor D fungicide receives federal registration

Priaxor D fungicide from BASF has received federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registration. A combination fungicide containing three modes of action, Priaxor D fungicide helps manage strobilurin-resistant frogeye leaf spot in soybeans while providing Advanced Plant Health benefits, including increased growth efficiency and stress tolerance.

News

Syngenta welcomes 2014 Resistance Fighters of the Year

To Josh Bailey and Tim Hambrick, managing resistance is critical to the future of farming – whether that’s herbicide, fungicide, insecticide or nematicide resistance. Both have made this a key component of their daily work, which is why Syngenta has selected them as the 2014 inductees into the Resistance Fighter of the Year Leadership Program.

News

Bt resistant armyworms migrating north

To date, fall armyworms have not been a major crop pest in North Carolina, since they can’t survive a winter freeze. Studies have shown that these insects often migrate north from Florida, and this year they were found in North Carolina corn fields as early as May. The real fear is that these Bt-resistant armyworms will move from corn to cotton.

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