The National Agricultural Statistical Service’s (NASS) May 9 Crop Progress reported that 33 percent of the winter wheat crop is rated good to excellent and 42 percent was rated poor to very poor. A year ago at this time, 66 percent of the winter wheat crop was rated good to excellent and only 8 percent was rated poor to very poor. The reason the 2011 winter wheat crop conditions are worse than a year ago is because of the persistent lack of moisture on the central and southern Plains.

Conditions are the worst in Texas and Oklahoma, but Colorado and Kansas are not far behind. In Texas and Oklahoma, 76 percent and 77 percent, respectively, of the wheat crop is rated poor to very poor. In these two States, zero percent of their crops are rated excellent. In Colorado and Kansas, 41 percent and 50 percent, respectively, of the wheat crop is rated poor to very poor. Fifteen percent of the Nebraska crop is rated poor to very poor.

Until recently, the conditions for most SRW States were much better than on the Plains. However, excessive moisture and flooding have sharply impacted crops in Arkansas and Missouri. The percentage of the crops in Arkansas and Missouri rated poor to very poor are 23 percent and 24 percent, respectively. The States of Illinois, Indiana, North Carolina, and Ohio average 67 percent of their crops rating good to excellent. Conditions are even better in the Pacific Northwest. Idaho, Oregon, and Washington average 80 percent of their crops rating good to excellent.