Poultry litter: Nutrient availability, value and storage practice

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Poultry litter can provide a significant and important supply of nutrients for crop production in areas of Kansas where a supply of litter is available. Although Kansas is not a major producer of poultry, there is an abundant supply of litter from the nearby states of Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma, which rank among the largest producers of poultry in the U.S. The acreage available to receive poultry litter has been declining in Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma in recent years because of environmental concerns. That trend, coupled with high fertilizer prices, has meant the availability of litter to areas such as southeast Kansas has been on the rise.

Poultry litter should serve as an excellent complement to commercial nitrogen (N) fertilizers. Phosphorus content in poultry litter is usually high, and applications rates should be based on P levels to avoid potential surface water contamination.  

Types of Poultry Litter

Source

Typical moisture content

Typical nutrient content (lbs/ton)

 

 

N

P

K

Layer

High

35

40

20

Pullet

Low

40

45

40

Breeder

High

40

60

40

Turkey

Low

60

60

55

Broiler

Low

60

60

55

Moisture content and nutrient concentration in poultry litter can be highly variable and depends mainly upon production conditions, storage, and handling methods. Therefore, laboratory analysis is the best way to determine the level of N and P in the material to be applied. The table above presents average values for the different types of poultry manure collected over a period of time. The table below presents the actual laboratory analysis of 67 poultry manure samples from southeast Kansas. There is a large range in nutrient values, likely due to the source of the litter. However, a good sample average to expect would be a 55-55-47.

For maximum efficiency of manure use, it is essential to know the nutrient content of the manure. Using a manure lab analysis will help in determining the actual nutrient rates applied. A laboratory analysis should be done on the poultry litter before applying it to land. A laboratory analyses provides information regarding nutrient levels, as well as the chemical forms of these nutrients. This information is necessary for an adequate estimation of nutrient availability and application rates. For more information, see K State Extension publication MF-2562, “Estimating Manure Nutrient Availability,” at: http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/library/crpsl2/mf2562.pdf

Nitrogen availability

Nitrogen and P crop availability shortly after application is a common question. In the case of N, it is important to consider that this nutrient is primarily in the organic form in poultry litter (up to 75-80% organic). Organic N needs to mineralize before becoming available to crops. A fraction of this organic N may become part of the soil organic matter pool and unavailable to crops in the short term.

Field and laboratory studies suggest the fraction of total nitrogen that becomes plant available the first year of application is approximately 45-55%, which includes both the inorganic N in the manure and a percentage of the organic N. This value varies depending upon components in the litter, and the method of handling and application. For example, poultry litter that contains a large fraction of bedding material will tend to have lower N availability the year of application. Reduction in N availability may also occur when litter is aged, and has undergone some level of composting. Nitrogen lost from the volatile ammonium fraction at the moment of application to the soil surface can also reduce plant available N. Ammonium volatilization is typically higher during windy and warm days. Incorporation of litter immediately after application will reduce volatilization and potential loss by water runoff in case of a rainfall event.

If the manure is applied to pastures, the percentage of nitrogen utilized by the forage the first year will depend on whether the pasture consists of cool-season or warm-season grasses. For cool-season grasses, such as fescue pasture, nitrogen utilization will likely be less than 50% the first year. Most of the growth in cool-season pasture occurs early in the year. Microbes will not mineralize as much N early in the spring as it will later in the summer. Fall applications may utilize more N for fescue than winter or spring applications. For warm-season grasses, such as bermudagrass pasture, nitrogen utilization from manure will likely be close to 50%. In both cases, producers should base application rates on the P and K needs of the grass, and supplement additional N fertilizer to meet the N needs of the grass.

Phosphorus and potassium availability

When manure is applied to the soil, what percentage of this phosphorus and potassium is available to the crop during the first year?

A large fraction of the phosphorus in manure is considered to be plant available immediately after application. The fraction that is not plant available shortly after application will become potentially available over time.

Estimated values of phosphorus availability are from 50 to 100%. This range accounts for variation in sampling and analysis, and for phosphorus requirements with different soil test levels. Use the lower end of the range of phosphorus availability values (50%) for soils testing “Very Low” and “Low” (below 20 ppm) in phosphorus. In these situations, large yield loss could occur if insufficient phosphorus is applied and soil phosphorus buildup is desirable.

On the other hand use 100% availability when manure is applied to maintain soil test phosphorus in the Optimum soil test category, and when the probability of a yield response is small.

Several studies have shown that manure P is a valuable resource, comparable to inorganic fertilizer P for crop production. These two P sources are similarly effective when the manure P concentration is known and the manure is applied properly.

Nevertheless, excessive application of manure phosphorus (for example, applying manure at rates sufficient to meet the crop’s nitrogen needs) often results in excessive soil phosphorus buildup over time, resulting in higher risk of surface water contamination. This problem of excessive phosphorus buildup in the long-term can be minimized by:

* Applying manure to cover the phosphorus needs of the crop and using inorganic sources of fertilizer to complement nitrogen needs,

* Constantly monitoring soil test phosphorus levels, and

* Using the P-index to assess potential impact of phosphorus buildup on water quality.

Producers should think in terms of actual phosphorus application rates and not just tons per acre of manure being applied. Uniform application of manure at precise rates can also be difficult. Careful calibration of manure applicators is needed. If these aspects are not considered, the efficiency of manure P compared with inorganic fertilizer P may be reduced. Careful management pays off.

Availability of potassium (K) is usually near 100% with proper application, poultry litter can also provide significant amounts of secondary and micronutrients.

 

Value of manure

The use of poultry litter can contribute to reduce cost of fertilizer inputs for many operations, depending on the price and transportation cost of the litter. For many farmers the use of poultry litter may represent significant savings. However, for many producers there is a “hassle factor” with using poultry litter.  Reliable delivery, storage site location, uniform application, access to application equipment, and odor can all be additional challenges to producers unfamiliar with its use, and should be a consideration.

How valuable is poultry manure? This may not be a straightforward answer and depends on several factors, including the nutrient(s) required for a specific field, but here’s one example using the average nutrient analysis values from Labette County of 55-55-47 (N-P-K lbs/ton):

• Year 1:

• 35% of N is inorganic (all available) = 19.3 lbs/ton

• 65% of N is organic (1/4th available in year 1) = 8.9 lbs/ton

• Total N available in year 1 = 28.2 lbs/ton

• Total value of N available in year 1 (@ $0.51/lb) = $14.38

• P is 50% available in year 1 = 27.5 lbs/ton

• Total value of P in year 1 (@ $0.65/lb) = $17.88

• K is 85% available in year 1 = 40.0 lbs/ton

• Total value of K in year 1 (@ $0.48/lb) = $19.20

Total in year 1 = $51.46/ton

Residual N and P = $31.55/ton

 

Storage

Proper storage of manure is important to prevent runoff contamination of water and odor problems. The following practices should be utilized:

• Avoid stockpiling litter near homes, public road ways and drainage ditches.

• Use tarps on litter piles to keep litter dry, reduce smell, and reduce N losses from volatilization.

• Stockpile litter at least 200 feet away from “Waters of the State.”

 

Additional considerations when selecting a suitable storage site

• Locate stockpiles in areas with minimal slope.

• Avoid sites that slope toward water ways and receive extraneous drainage.

• Locate sites in areas surrounded by grass that can serve as a buffer.

• Avoid sensitive groundwater areas and sites in close proximity to wells.


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howard garrett    
Dallas  |  December, 04, 2012 at 06:57 AM

What about the pharmaceuticals (drugs) in the material that results from the various medicines regularly given to the animals?


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