Source: University of Wisconsin



By early August 2008, reports started coming in to county Extension offices and the University of Wisconsin of soybean fields with symptoms similar to Phytophthora root rot (PRR). Because many of these fields were planted to varieties containing the Rps 1k gene, serious concern arose over the breakdown of resistance to PRR conferred by this gene.



The 2008 growing season was one of extremes. Heavy rains early in the year led to flooded field conditions and anxiety about diseases caused by Pythium and Phytophthora. Then the rains stopped, fields dried out, and drought-like conditions occurred throughout much of the state. In spite of these dry conditions, by early August reports started coming in to county extension offices and the University of Wisconsin of soybean fields with symptoms similar to PRR. Because many of these fields were planted to varieties containing the Rps 1k gene, serious concern arose over the breakdown of resistance to PRR conferred by this gene.



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