Source: Purdue University


Soybeans engineered to be resistant to the herbicides dicamba and glyphosate performed well in field tests with weeds that have become resistant to glyphosate alone, according to Bill Johnson, Purdue professor of weed science.


Johnson said dicamba has been known to work well on weeds that appear in soybean fields, but it had to be applied to the ground long before soybeans were planted because the crops also were susceptible to the herbicide. A new dicamba-resistant soybean, which also is resistant to glyphosate, can handle an application after planting, according to trial work that Johnson published in the journal Crop Management.


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