Growers who apply Nitamin(R) 30L or Nitamin Nfusion(R)Controlled-Release nitrogen from Georgia-Pacific could qualify for a $12- to $22-per-acre incentive from the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP), a new federal conservation program offered through the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The deadline for the first round of applications is September 30, 2009.



NRCS, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, recently released details of the revamped CSP which provides financial incentives to landowners for conserving and enhancing the quality of air, water and other resources. Growers who use a controlled-release fertilizer such as Nitamin 30L or Nitamin Nfusion fertilizer may qualify for the financial incentives because they improve water quality by limiting the loss of nitrogen through leaching and denitrification.



Nitamin Steady-Delivery nitrogen solutions provide a continual supply of nitrogen to the crop through polymer release and soil enzyme action. Marketed for use in corn, small grains, vegetable and fruit crops, Nitamin fertilizers are designed to synchronize with each crop's uptake demand for more efficient nitrogen utilization during the growing season. Nitamin products bind to the soil and stay there.



"Our nation's growers are already committed environmental stewards of their farmland and rural landscapes, and the revamped CSP will reward them for many of the ecologically sound practices that they are already incorporating on their farms," says Jon Mixson, national sales and marketing manager for Georgia-Pacific Plant Nutrition. "We are excited to be a part of this important conservation initiative by providing controlled-release nitrogen products that help growers achieve their crop production and environmental objectives."



The CSP is available on a continuous application basis with a deadline of September 30, 2009, for the first round of applications. The payment rate is expected to be between $12 and $22 per acre with the NRCS determining the payment levels after October 1, 2009.