A team of scientists is asking farmers to provide information about how they are managing herbicide-resistant weeds for a study on the human dimension of weed control.

Beginning this month, the team of weed scientists, economists and sociologists will conduct a survey of farmers who manage a wide range of corn, soybean, cotton and sugar beet enterprises.

With support from a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agriculture and Food Research Initiative grant, the team seeks to gain a better understanding of the causes and consequences of herbicide-resistant weeds and the strategies farmers use to cope with them.  The project also addresses barriers farmers face in adopting more diverse strategies for herbicide- resistant weed management.

The spread of herbicide-resistant weeds is a growing problem in many parts of the U.S. While herbicide resistance has existed for decades, the number of weed species with resistance to glyphosate and other herbicides has risen dramatically in recent years.

"As the people on the front lines of herbicide resistance, our North Dakota farmers have a unique experience and understanding of the problem and the opportunities for cost-effective approaches," says Rich Zollinger, North Dakota State University Extension Service weed specialist. "The information they provide will be critical, and we hope they will take the time to complete the survey."

The team includes scientists from Iowa State University, Michigan State University, Portland State University, North Carolina State University, University of Arizona, University of Minnesota, University of Arkansas and Mississippi State University.

For more information, North Dakota farmers can contact Zollinger at r.zollinger@ndsu.edu or (701) 231-8157.