CSREES released a Federal Register notice today to gather additional input on the Extension Integrated Pest Management (EIPM) competitive grants program that was announced in October 2008. Comments will be accepted through April 30, 2009, and will be used in developing the FY 2010 EIPM request for applications.



"As this new program is developed, we want to assure that the concepts are advanced to the best degree possible, serving clientele, practitioners and ultimately, consumers," said Marty Draper, CSREES national program leader for integrated pest management.



The EIPM program supports the advancement of the National Roadmap for Integrated Pest Management by addressing priority needs associated with the coordination, design, development, implementation and evaluation of EIPM programs. Funding for the program will help agricultural producers and other pest managers adopt alternative pest management practices through training, demonstrations and evaluation of methods and strategies.



The 2008 Farm Bill made changes to the long-standing Smith-Lever 3(d) formula-based funding of EIPM programs to require a competitive model. The bill also included 1890 institutions and the University of the District of Columbia as eligible applicants.



A listening session was held in October 2008, and efforts were made to incorporate suggestions from this meeting into the EIPM program for FY 2009. The FY 2009 request for applications was issued on November 20, 2008. CSREES is now seeking additional input to help CSREES leadership address more fully stakeholder needs in structuring the program for future years. In addition to the Federal Register notice, a public meeting will be held on Thursday, March 26, 2009, from 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. in Portland, Ore.



The Federal Register notice can be found online.



A synopsis of comments from the October 2008 listening session is available online.



Through federal funding and leadership for research, education and extension programs, CSREES focuses on investing in science and solving critical issues impacting people's daily lives and the nation's future.



SOURCE: USDA.