Planting is unfinished, and for some, may never be this year

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In some parts of the Cornbelt many farmers have been dodging showers to get as many acres of corn and soybeans planted as possible, despite being beyond the final date for planting for crop insurance coverage. Late planting deducts 1% coverage per day, but there will be many farms which finished planting by the deadline to secure their full coverage. However there will be many farms which remain too wet to plant, particularly in the northern Cornbelt states which had perfect weather and great yields last year and planned to expand their corn and soybean acreage this year. As this report indicates it is not a pretty sight everywhere.

Nationally, 95% of the US corn crop had been planted as of June 9 according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service Weekly Crop Progress Report. That compares to 91% a week ago and 100% last year. Emergence jumped to 85% nationally, compared to only 74 % last week. The condition of the corn crop is rated 63% good to excellent and not far behind the 66% last year. 

Cornbelt state

Corn planted as of June 9

Corn emerged as of June 9

Soybeans planted as of June 9

Soybeans emerged as of June 9

Illinois

96

89

62

43

Indiana

98

90

87

70

Iowa

92

81

60

39

Kansas

98

91

66

43

Michigan

98

91

90

73

Minnesota

90

78

72

38

Missouri

93

82

48

31

Nebraska

100

91

94

71

North Dakota

89

67

69

25

Ohio

100

94

94

75

South Dakota

99

91

82

29

Wisconsin

81

60

55

28

Soybean planting nationally reached 71% on June 9, up from 57% last week and 97% a year ago. Emergence is at the 48% mark, compared to 31% on June 2 and 88% last year at this time. 

Some interesting analysis offered by Twitter users:

  • USDA says soy plant progress at 71%, matching trade expectations. Iowa at 60% vs its average at 95%. Slowest US progress for date since 1996.
  • USDA says corn planting at 95% complete, in line with expectations. Iowa at 92% vs 99% for its avg. USDA will not update corn plant next week.
  • 48% of US soybeans emerged as of Sunday, up 17 points on week, but down 19 pts from 5-yr average
  • 85% of corn emerged, up from 74% previous week, but down from 5-yr average of 92%
  • USDA - Corn rates 8% Poor to Very Poor, up 1 point from the previous week
  • USDA data would suggest that 4.9 million acres of corn still unplanted; IL 488K, IA 1.1 million, MN 0.9 million, ND 451K, WI 827K
  • Unplanted soybean acres probably do not include acres that will shift from corn/spring wheat
  • Data suggests that unplanted soybean acres - IL 3.6, IA 3.8, MN 1.9, MO 2.8, ND 1.5 million acres
  • USDA data suggests 22.4 million acres of soybeans are still unplanted as of Sunday, with 40.1 yet to emerge
  • Iowa has 3.76 million acres of soybeans left to plant. If on the normal pace, there would be just 470,000 acres left.
  • And with 1.14 million acres of corn left to plant, Iowa really has about 4.5(?) million acres of beans left to plant.
  • 4.86 million acres unplanted in US. 2.5 of which reside in IA/MN/ND.
  • USDA says spring wheat at 62% good to excellent, down 2 from last week. North Dakota at 69%. Planting still very late at 87% vs 96% avg. 84% in '11
  • 71% of spring wheat is emerged as of Sunday, up 10 points on the week, but down 18 points from 5-yr average for week
  • 87% of spring wheat planted as of Sunday, up from 80% previous week; 5-yr average for the week is 96%

The following reports come from the NASS weekly summary of Cornbelt state crop reports,  and reflect their moisture status and analysis of planting prospects for those producers who are waiting for fields to dry.

ILLINOIS: Topsoil moisture 64% adequate, 36% surplus. Subsoil moisture 1% short, 71% adequate, 28% surplus. Farmers found small windows of time to plant corn and soybeans and a few had dry enough conditions to bale hay. Some of those that have planted in previous weeks have found their corn to be emerging unevenly, so there will be some replanting.

INDIANA: Topsoil moisture 4% short, 71% adequate, 25% surplus. Subsoil moisture 1% very short, 3% short, 79% adequate, 17% surplus. Cool, dry days across the central and northern districts allowed farmers to resume field work as soils dried out from the previous week’s heavy rainfall. Many operations were busy planting soybeans, side dressing corn and spraying post emergence herbicides.

IOWA: Topsoil moisture 42% adequate and 58% surplus. Subsoil moisture 2% short, 60% adequate and 38% surplus. Rainfall continued to limit fieldwork for Iowa farmers during the week. Fields already wet from the previous week, did not dry enough between rain events to allow significant planting progress to be made.

KANSAS: Topsoil moisture 16% very short, 19% short, 53% adequate, 12% surplus. Subsoil moisture 26% very short, 26% short, 43% adequate, and 5% surplus. Many wet fields from the previous week are slow to dry out, causing further planting delays, especially in low-lying areas. Despite some scattered showers, most of western Kansas is still extremely dry.

MICHIGAN: Topsoil 1% very short, 9% short, 77% adequate, 13% surplus. Subsoil 3% very short, 9% short, 75% adequate, 13% surplus. Weather last week cool and dry which allowed for ample field work to occur. Many growers finished up planting corn and soybeans. Cool temperatures caused some necrosis corn.

MINNESOTA: Topsoil moisture 0% Very Short, 1% Short, 60% Adequate, and 39% Surplus. Subsoil moisture 1% Very Short, 7% Short, 70% Adequate, and 22% Surplus. Corn land prepared 94%, 100% 2012, 100% average. The weather conditions in Minnesota for the week ending June 9, 2013 remained cooler than normal.

MISSOURI: Topsoil moisture 62% adequate, 38% surplus. Subsoil moisture supply 2% short, 80% adequate, 18% surplus. Wet soil conditions from the previous week’s heavy rains limited fieldwork.

NEBRASKA: Topsoil moisture 6% very short, 21% short, 69% adequate, 4% surplus. Subsoil moisture 23 very short, 35% short, 41% adequate, 1% surplus. For the week ending June 9, 2013, drier conditions allowed producers time to accomplish fieldwork ranging from planting to bailing hay and applying chemicals. Soybean planting is nearly complete.

NORTH DAKOTA: Topsoil moisture 1% short, 53% adequate, 46% surplus. Subsoil moisture 4% short, 70% adequate, 26% surplus. Rain continued to cause problems by either halting or slowing planting progress last week. Persistent moisture the past few weeks has left standing water in many fields around the State and no crops will be planted on those fields as a result. For some crops that did get planted, there are reports of crops emerging well and looking good. However, other reports indicate germination problems and emerged crops have “yellowed” as a result of the cool, wet weather conditions. Warmer, drier weather is needed across the State to help crop growth and development. Besides trying to get the last of their crops planted, producers are also busy spraying their emerged crops.

OHIO: Topsoil 2% very short, 12% short, 75% adequate, 11% surplus. Subsoil 2% very short, 14% short, 80% adequate, 4% surplus. Producers took advantage of continued warm weather and completed planting of corn and oats, and neared completion of soybean planting. Some producers also replanted crops lost due to frost. Nitrogen application to corn also moved quickly, with some counties reporting that it nearly finished. Some areas received rain this week, while others hoping rain will come soon to keep soil moisture at adequate levels.

SOUTH DAKOTA: Topsoil moisture 0% very short, 5% short, 79% adequate, 16% surplus. Subsoil moisture 2% very short, 20% short, 73% adequate, 5% surplus. Wet and cool conditions continued again this week limiting fieldwork. The cool conditions also slowed crop growth and development.

WISCONSIN: Topsoil moisture 1% short, 55% adequate, and 44% surplus. Subsoil moisture 2% short, 72% adequate, and 26% surplus. Spring tillage 85%, 100% 2012, 100% avg. Average corn height (in.) 5in., 10in. 2012, 5in. avg. Farmers were considering their options this week as persistent cold, wet and overcast conditions kept fields soggy. Statewide, topsoil moisture was 44 percent surplus compared to 35 percent last week. Many reporters noted standing water and drowned out or implantable areas in bottomlands. Progress totals for planting and emergence of all crops, tillage and haying remained well behind normal. Some uncompleted corn planting was reportedly being abandoned in favor of shorter season crops, especially in the north. Reporters commented that emerged corn and soybeans were looking yellow and short due to the lack of heat.


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